longmrclogo.gif (25976 bytes)

 

 


TO PURCHASE RADIOACTIVE MINERALS, DOWNLOAD LIABILITY WAIVER CLICK HERE, PRINT, SIGN AND FAX, OR EMAIL BACK.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION REGARDING RADIOACTIVE MINERAL SPECIMENS ! !  CLICK HERE

 

 


DUE TO CURRENT INTERNATIONAL POSTAL REGULATIONS, WE CAN ONLY SHIP  RADIOACTIVE MINERALS TO DESTINATIONS LOCATED WITHIN THE U.S.A.
 


= Fluorescent Specimen
   =  Radioactive Specimen


2619

2761

2762

2825 FRONT

2825 BACK

URANINITE, AUTUNITE, KASOLITE, URANOPHANE, β-URANOPHANE, PHOSPHURANYLITE, SODDYITE, “GUMMITE”    
Ruggles Mine, Grafton, Grafton Co., New Hampshire

This world-renowned Eastern USA locality for uranium-bearing minerals has been known for more than 200 years, since about 1803.  This is quite a long history for any mineral locality in the USA, since the USA has only been an entity since 1776!   Mining was initially begun for Mica (Muscovite), used at that time in the manufacture of translucent panes for lamps and stoves.  The importance of the uranium-bearing minerals at the Ruggles Mine was noted by mineral collectors as early as the mid-1930’s, however, the mine was operated commercially as a producer of Beryl and Feldspar up until 1959. 

The Ruggles Mine has been famous among mineral collectors as a source for Uraninite specimens and other radioactive minerals, and is popular as a source of material for preparing autoradiographs, i.e., photographic records that generally produce a black and white dendrite-like image when the specimen is exposed to a sheet of photographic film for 8-12 hours.  If you have a copy of “Systematic Mineralogy of Uranium and Thorium”, by C. Frondel (USGS Bulletin 1064) in your reference library please refer to page 8, and  Plate 1, facing page 32 for additional information on autoradiographs.  If you want to purchase a copy of “Systematic Mineralogy of Uranium and Thorium”, by C. Frondel (USGS Bulletin 1064) for your reference library, please refer to the following page on our web site.  This is an absolute “must have” reference book for anyone interested in radioactive minerals!  Published by the U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. in 1958.  We have several original, new copies, printed in 1958, available here

Minerals most often noted on specimens from the Ruggles Mine include massive black Uraninite, “Gummite”, Kasolite, Curite, Soddyite, Uranophane, Autunite, Phosphuranylite, and several others.  “Gummite” is a generic term for a mixture of yellow to orange color massive uranium-bearing minerals, usually consisting of Kasolite, Curite, Soddyite, Uranophane, and several others.  Where present, both the Autunite and Phosphuranylite are fluorescent under SW UV.   Light green massive Fluorapatite is present on specimen MI-2619, along with minor Muscovite, massive Quartz, and several very small patches of massive brown Zircon Var. Cyrtolite (metamict, non-fluorescent).  Item 2825 is an extremely rich specimen with white Microcline matrix containing very rich aggregates of the Uraninite intergrown with orange Gummite, and a yellow mixture consisting largely of Soddyite and β-Uranophane.  Thin coatings of Autunite produce bright yellow-green responses to the ultraviolet lamp under shortwave UV.

 

 

 ITEM
NO.

 WEIGHT
(GRAMS)

 SPECIMEN SIZE
(INCHES)

 SPECIMEN
PRICE

 

2619

195.45

2

1 7/8

1 5/8

SOLD

 

2761

62.16

1 3/4

1 1/2

7/8

SOLD

 

2762

66.13

2 1/8

1 5/8

3/4

SOLD

 

2825

1,470.00

5 5/8

5

2 1/4

SOLD


2763

2764

2765
SALEEITE   Ranger No. 3 Deposit, Jabiru, 250 Km East of Darwin, Northern Territory, Australia  

The radioactive mineral deposit known as the Ranger Mine was first identified in 1968. Work began at the Ranger No. 1 Mine in 1980, continuing until that part of the deposit was exhausted in 1994. Mining at the No. 3 Deposit started in 1997, ceasing operation in 2012, with the processing of the stockpile expected to last until 2020. The specimens offered here are from the Ranger No. 3 Deposit, and are similar to the typical Ranger No. 3 specimens shown on MINDAT.  That is, tabular, bright yellow green Saléeite crystals are scattered in open vuggy areas in iron oxide stained Quartz matrix. Saléeite is a member of the Autunite group, and the UV fluorescence is brilliant yellow-green under both SW and LW UV.

Chemical composition is: Mg(UO2)2(PO4)2·10H2O. 
Items 2763 and 2767 are in natural condition, as collected; items 2764, 2765, 2766, and 2768 have each had the back of the specimen sawed to eliminate excess matrix, for display purposes.
 

 

ITEM
NO.

SPECIMEN SIZE
(INCHES)

SPECIMEN
PRICE

 

2763

4 3/4

2 1/8

2

SOLD

 

2764

4

2 3/4

1 1/8

SOLD

 

2765

3 1/2

2 5/8

1 3/8

$ 140.00

 

2766

4 1/2

2

1 7/8

$ 160.00

 

2767

2 5/8

1 3/8

7/8

SOLD

 

2768

6 1/4

3 3/8

2 3/8

SOLD


 


2766

2767

2768 FRONT

2768 BACK
  
1835

1836

1837

1838

1839

COLUMBITE-(Mn) (formerly Manganocolumbite)
Mica Lode Mine, Eight Mile Park Pegmatite District, Fremont County, Colorado
This well known pegmatite deposit was first written up in the 1940’s by E. William Heinrich of the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor.  For more recent information see “Minerals of Colorado”, by E. B. Eckel, 1997, P. 160 and 359.  All specimens in this group are pure, dark brown-black massive Columbite-(Mn), not the commoner phase Columbite-(Fe).  Compare:
Columbite-(Fe):    Fe2+Nb2O6
Columbite-(Mn):  (Mn2+,Fe2+)(Nb,Ta)2O6  
While Columbite-(Mn) is generally not a radioactive mineral, the radioactivity present in these specimens is probably due to minor amounts of U or UO2. Other radioactive minerals identified from this deposit include Uraninite, Parsonsite, and Uranpyrochlore.  Items MI-1835 through MI-1844 are Columbite-(Mn) with very minor, or no associated minerals.  Very thin coatings of pale pink Muscovite can be seen on some specimens.  There is a strong possibility that minor amounts of crystalline, dark brown Uranpyrochlore are present on the backs of specimens MI-1842 and MI-1849, but the associates have not been analyzed.  In the table below, items MI-1845 through 1850, Columbite-(Mn) is associated with small amounts of pale yellow to yellow-tan massive coatings of Parsonsite.   None of the specimens in either group have rock matrix.

 

 

SPECIMEN NUMBER

WEIGHT
(GRAMS)

SPECIMEN SIZE
(INCHES)

    mR/hr @ 1”
CD V-700 GM
COUNTER

    CPM @ 1”
CD V-700 GM
COUNTER

 SPECIMEN
PRICE

 

1835

21.62

1 1/8

7/8

1/2

10

7,500

SOLD

 

1836

41.74

1 1/2

7/8

1/2

10

7,500

SOLD

 

1837

47.34

1 1/8

1

5/8

4

2,500

SOLD

 

1838

70.45

1 1/4

1

7/8

5

3,000

SOLD

 

1839

124.83

1 5/8

1 1/8

1

5

3,000

SOLD

 

1840

251.50

1 7/8

1 5/8

1 3/8

10

7,500

SOLD

 

1841

391.20

2 7/8

2 1/2

1 1/2

5

3,000

SOLD

 

1842

488.00

2 5/8

2 3/8

1

5

3,000

$ 170.00

 

1843

700.25

2 3/8

2

1 5/8

5

3,000

SOLD

 

1844

1,555.30

3 7/8

3 3/8

1 3/4

5

3,000

$ 390.00



 


1840

1841

1842

1843

1844


1845

1846

1847

PARSONSITE
The following Columbite-(Mn) specimens from the Mica Lode Mine also have very thin massive coatings of secondary, pale yellow to yellow-tan massive Parsonsite present on one or more of the natural surfaces of the Columbite-(Mn).  Parsonsite is: Pb2UO2(PO4)2.  Not attractive.  None of the specimens have rock matrix.
 

 

 

SPECIMEN NUMBER

 WEIGHT
(GRAMS)

 SPECIMEN SIZE
(INCHES)

mR/hr @ 1”
CD V-700 GM
COUNTER

CPM @ 1”
CD V-700 GMCOUNTER

 SPECIMEN
PRICE

 

1845

30.59

1 1/8

7/8

1/2

7

5,500

SOLD

 

1846

95.50

1 5/8

1 5/8

5/8

5

3,000

$  52.00

 

1847

138.33

1 3/4

1 5/8

7/8

9

7,000

SOLD

 

1848

215.00

1 5/8

1 1/2

1 3/8

20

13,300

SOLD

 

1849

302.70

2 1/4

2 1/8

1

5

3,000

SOLD

 

1850

621.85

3 1/8

2

1 1/2

7

5,500

$ 215.00

 


1848

1849


1850


2790

2791

2792

2793

URANINITE 
Jáchymov (St. Joachimsthal), Krušné Hory Mountains (Erzgebirge), Karlovy Vary Region, Bohemia, Czech Republic (type locality for Uraninite)

The mines at Jáchymov were first worked for Silver beginning in the early 1500’s.  Mining continued for several hundred years.  In addition to Silver, ores of Bismuth, Uranium, Iron and Nickel were also recovered.  At the beginning of the 20th century, Marie Curie discovered the element radium, from ores mined at Jachymov, for which she won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry. Until the First World War this was the only known source of radium in the world.  After the Communist party took control of Czechoslovakia in 1948, a large prison camp was established in the town now named Jáchymov.  Opponents of the new regime were forced to mine Uranium ore under very harsh conditions: the average life expectancy in Jáchymov during this period was 42 years.  As a result of the publicity given to Pitchblende (historical name for Uraninite) during that time period, the ore was believed to be very valuable and miners were strictly forbidden from taking specimens from the mines. 

In more recent years, it seems some of the local mineral collectors have been finding small specimens on some of the historical ore dumps.  These exhibit the micro botryoidal habit for which Uraninite specimens from the Jáchymov mines are best known.  The botryoidal Uraninite was formed as thin veinlets coating fracture seams in the matrix.

Note:  The gram weights are given as a measure of size -- specimens are not priced by the gram.

 

ITEM
NO.

GRAM WEIGHT

SPECIMEN SIZE
LENGTH X WIDTH
X THICKNESS (INCHES)

mR/hr @ 1”
CD V-700 GM
COUNTER

CPM @ 1”
CD V-700 GM
COUNTER

 SPECIMEN
PRICE

 

2790

13.06

1 3/8

7/8

1/2

.45

275

SOLD

 

2791

26.00

1 1/2

1 3/8

1

20

13,300

$ 135.00

 

2792

56.21

2 1/4

1 1/4

3/8 to 5/8

25

16,600

$ 175.00

 

2793

114.77

3

1 3/8

1 3/4

30

20,000

$ 250.00

 NOTE:  See the write-up, directly below, regarding a book currently available on the minerals of the Jachymov mining district.

NEW TITLE

“JACHYMOV”,  JOURNAL OF THE CZECH GEOLOGICAL SOCIETY, Edited by Dr. Stanislav Vrana, 11 5/8” X 8 1/4”,  in English, 230 pages, with numerous black & white, as well as color photos, crystal drawings, and SEM’s of the minerals, soft cover.  Your first question is probably…  why would we recommend a book covering such an obscure locality in Czechoslovakia??  Well, read on!  “Jachymov” is the result of years of hard scientific work, and it is the most comprehensive publication about the mines and minerals of the Jachymov Silver and Uranium district ever written.  Jachymov (known as Joachimsthal in old literature) gained world renown through important achievements and discoveries associated with mining and scientific activities during five centuries of exploitation of the ore deposits.  Most recently, the mines at Jachymov were the key producers of the uranium-bearing minerals used by the Russians during the cold war arms race with the USA.  On an historical note, for a part of the 16th century, Jachymov ranked as the largest Silver producer in the world.  It was the Uraninite from Jachymov on which Maria Sklodowska (Madam Curie) first isolated and discovered two new elements – Polonium and Radium – in 1898.  More than 380 minerals have been identified from Jachymov to date, and the current studies will eventually bring this number up to over 400!  This in-depth report covers the geology of the Jachymov ore district, followed by 137 pages of mineral descriptions with many more than 100 color photos, SEM’s, and crystal drawings.   The next chapter covers the ore-forming processes and mineral parageneses of the Jachymov district.  The chapter on “Who was who in Jachymov mineralogy” presents historical information concerning the discovery of primary minerals first described from Jachymov.  The biographic information about important people after whom the minerals were named goes back to the 17th century, and includes photographs or portraits of most of these important people. The final chapter covers the history of discovery and study of new primary minerals, and includes photographs of two old labels from mineral specimens recovered in the 1800’s, now in the National Museum of Prague.  Published by the Czech Geological Society, 2003, Prague, Czech Republic.

Shipping weight:  3 pounds
Order Item BK0353
Price:  $125.00

 

        MORE SPECIMENS   PAGE 1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10

Copyright 1998-2017 by Mineralogical Research Co.
All rights reserved.